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The role of C fibres in the generation of an increase in the flexor response to noxious stimuli

The role of C fibres in the generation of an increase in the flexor response to noxious stimuli

More for the thirsty (for knowledge) pain geek! Clifford Woolf and Pat Wall probing the role of C fibres in the generation of an increase in the flexor response to noxious stimuli.In other words:

– Suck some brain out of rats but keep enough in so they are still technically alive.

– Pick one of 3 different methods that will strongly stimulate (conditioning stimuli) the nerves – electrocute, irritate with a chemical, make the muscle work really hard for a long time

–  Look at how the rat responds before and after they’ve been conditioned with these stimuli- Then find out what happens if you block the nerves – before and after the conditioning stimuli

–  Demonstrate that the increased response to a noxious stimulus long after the conditioning stimuli has a strong central (in the spinal cord) component

–  Call this heterosynaptic facilitation- Wonder if these mechanisms have any baring on people experiencing chronic painIn their words:”Peripheral activation of C-afferents will modify the functional response of the spinal cord to other inputs applied long after the conditioning input, and this may be responsible for some of the sensory and motor alterations found after peripheral tissue injury.”

“The excitability increase is heterosynaptic because a conditioning stimulus in one group of primary afferents increases the response to other groups of afferents.”

“The presence of widespread tenderness (allodynia) with disordered movement is frequently the most disturbing symptom in patients in chronic pain. Therefore, the phenomena we report here deserves further attention as a possible model of a particularly distressing human state.”

 

Check it out!

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